Monthly Archives: March 2007

Open Source Observatory and Repository meets QualiPSo project

Open Source Observatory and Repository project (OSOR), an European Commission IDABC initiative meets some QualiPSo members.

The aim of this meeting was to try to find synergies between two European Commission projects:

  • OSOR that will (i) setup an open source repository for the European Public Administrations, (ii) provide news, guidance, links, contacts concerning Free Libre Open Source Software, (iii) providing technical, organisational, and legal support to apply Open Source concepts inside the Public Administrations.
  • QualiPSo is a unique alliance of European, Brazilian and Chinese ICT industry players, SMEs, governments and academics to help industries and governments fuel innovation and competitiveness with Open Source software. To meet that goal, the QualiPSo consortium intends to define and implement the technologies, processes and policies to facilitate the development and use of Open Source software components, with the same level of trust traditionally offered by proprietary software.QualiPSo is the ever largest Open Source initiative funded by the European Commission, and is funded under EU’s sixth framework program (FP6), as part of the Information Society Technologies (IST) initiative. QualiPSo is launched in synergy with Europe’s technology initiatives such as NESSI and Artemis.

In short, to setup a repository for Public Administrations we need (i) Quality Software factories reviewing the quality/reliability of the free softwares available on the forge, (ii) best practices concerning the development of Open Source Software are shared accross organisations, (iii) state of the art stacks reliable and usable by any organisation; many deliverables that will be delivered by QualiPSo team during the next 4 years.

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J2EE is dying, competition doesn’t means innovation everytime but, digging its own tomb

Competition means Innovation but Java is dying because of the amount of frameworks that are available. I wonder if someone is smart enough to understand and follow the amount of MVC frameworks, Design patterns or Object Relational Mapping tools that are available?

We can try to calculate the combinations of solutions (I don’t try to be exhaustive):

Web application frameworks: Apache Tapestry, Backbase, Bindows, DOJO, Eclipse RAP, Echo2, GWT, JFaces, Java Server Faces, JaverServer Pages, JavaServer Type Libraries, Struts, WebWork… (13)
Application frameworks: Spring, EJB3, Guice, Pico, Rico… (5)
Data access frameworks: Apache OJB, Cayenne, DBC, iBatis, JDBC, Hibernate, JDO, JPA, Oracle Toplink… (9)

Which means something like 13 * 5 * 9 combinations;  I let you to make the calculation!

Dear developers and architects, when will you stop thinking that your framework is better than the others and create your own one ? Could you participate to already existing ones instead?